Audio Review: The Titan’s Curse (Percy Jackson, Book 3) by Rick Riordan

by First Mate Keira on September 23, 2013 · 5 comments

in 3.5-4 Treasure Chests, Action & Adventure, Audio Book Review, Fantasy, Guest Review, P-R, YA Genre

guestreview

by First Mate Keira, guest reviewer

Title: The Titan’s Curse
Author:
Rick Riordan
Narrator: Jesse Bernstein
Format: Unabridged Audio Compact Discs
# CDs + Minutes: 7 CDs (8 hours, 48 minutes)
Grade Reading Level: Ages 9-12

Summary: When saving two Half-Bloods from a monster, Annabeth is captured. The goddess Artemis goes off and also gets captured. The days are ticking down to the winter solstice, but there’s nothing Percy can do as his question to the oracle was left unanswered. However, the oracle prophesizes to one of Artemis’ Hunters and a new quest with new and greater dangers is undergone. Will they be able to rescue Annabeth and Artemis in time?

Why I Started This Book:

The Titan’s Curse is the third book in the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series and having read the first two, it only made sense to keep going.

Likes:

  • All the “A-list” gods are in this one: Artemis, Apollo, Athena, Aphrodite, and Ares.
  • Apollo is a hunk who likes fast cars (no chariots for him) and is always randomly spouting off terrible poetry.
  • Aphrodite’s maneuvering to get Percy on the quest. It’s hilarious when you get to how she did it and why.
  • Hades’ kids come to play, but not in a way you would expect. Percy will explain as he figures it out and understands before the others do.

Dislikes:

  • Jesse Bernstein missed the mark on several voices. Dionysus sounds different to me in this novel than in the previous editions. His voice is more like Tyson than Dionysus. Actually a few of the characters who were periphery to the quest and bad guys also sounded like Tyson. It was weird and I didn’t like it.

Last minute thoughts: I do hope the others on the library waiting list hurry up and get done with the next couple of books so I can get all caught up and soon!

Buy: The Titan’s Curse (Audio Book), The Titan’s Curse (Paperback), Percy Jackson and the Olympians Paperback Boxed Set (Books 1-3), Percy Jackson and the Olympians Hardcover Boxed Set (Books 1 – 5)

Book Rating: 4 Treasure Chests
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Keira runs a book review blog for readers by readers on romance novels entitled Love Romance Passion. She’s been reading romance since she was in her teens and began blogging about romance so she could share her passion for her favorite genre. She loves reading paranormal, Regency, historical America, and highlander most of all and completely adores blind and wounded heroes.

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Susan S. October 27, 2009 at 7:08 am

That’s exactly how I feel when reading “any” series, it only makes sense to keep going. Especially if one likes the author’s writing style. I’ve seen this book at the school book fairs, it’s mythology heavy then? Nice!

Reply

First Mate Keira October 27, 2009 at 7:20 pm

Very much so. I think the author does a good job at conveying the different myths in a way that’s both interesting and factual.

Reply

Second Mate Embry November 6, 2009 at 4:22 pm

I would give Titan’s Curse between 3.5 and 4 treasure chests. It’s currently my second favorite in the series (I’m reading book four now).

I liked Bianca and Nico di Angelo and that they were Hades’ kids. It is interesting to point out that Hades didn’t break the oath between Zeus and Poseidon because Bianca and Nico have been trapped for 70 years or so in the Lotus hotel from book one. Who would have guessed that Hades is the one who takes his word the most seriously?

I didn’t get why it was Titan’s Curse. Can someone explain that?

Reply

First Mate Keira November 6, 2009 at 4:37 pm

Hi Embry! Of course. It’s called Titan’s Curse because of Atlas.

Atlas is cursed or punished because he sided with the Titans in their war against the Olympians in Greek mythology. He was condemned to stand at the western edge of the earth and hold up the sky so it would not fall.

As Rick Riordan interpreted in this book Atlas could not pass on his burden to anyone else. It had to be freely taken. Whereas at the end of the story Artemis tricked Atlas into reclaiming his duty from Percy. Atlas doesn’t have to be willing at all.

I think this also applies to other Titans too. If another Titan is tricked into carrying the sky, he must endure it until another Titan is either tricked or someone else willingly takes the curse.

Hope that helped!

Reply

Second Mate Embry November 6, 2009 at 4:40 pm

Oh I get it now! That makes so much sense! Thanks Keira!

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